Skye. Supernatural, Avengers, Doctor Who, Sherlock. Human rights. Sex positive.



troyetroyetroye:

trxyesweater:

Two funny things

1. She has game. Like A LOT!!!

2. In the show he was literally the technology expert…

Iconic

To them, ‘Asian’ is our defining characteristic, in a way that ‘white’ would never be used to define themselves. When the “Yellow Fever”ed men speak to me, they aren’t speaking to me, they’re speaking to their idea of an Asian woman, their fantasy made flesh. They’re speaking to every Asian woman they’ve ever seen in the media, every Asian porn actress they’ve ever leered at on their computer screens. My personality tries to push itself forward, but is rendered invisible, obscured by the lenses of racial stereotype.

Exotification – I’m Not Your Pretty Little Lotus Flower | Crates and Ribbons (via brutereason)     

(Source: folkdad)

fan-troll:

taratiki17:

punmonster:

one of the most beautiful sailor moons there

a pic from otakon! thank you ^.^

THE AFRO PUFFS THO
high resolution »

fan-troll:

taratiki17:

punmonster:

one of the most beautiful sailor moons there

a pic from otakon! thank you ^.^

THE AFRO PUFFS THO

maliciousmelons:

my anaconda dont want none unless you got funds hun

nantajoong:


fraubraun:

koreanstudentsspeak:

Left:

I want a go home I’m tired

Right:

Don’t Hit ME


what’s happenin in korea

You want to know what’s happening? Korea’s education system is literally the most rotten piece of shit to ever exist. 
Let me explain the context of the poster on the left. 
The average time a kid spends in school in the US is 900 to 1000 hours per year, spread between 175-180 days (x)
In 2007 there were mass student protests in Netherlands because they increased the hours spent in school to 1040 hours per year, or 8 hours a day, 130 days a year. (x)
Korean high schools, on the other hand, enact a 3150 policy, 225 days of school with 14 hours a day, or from 8 am to 10 pm (x)
Also due to the private education sector of hagwons and the fierce competition of Korean high schools, basically after school kids go to hagwons, or personal academies, till 2, 3 in the morning, fit in maybe 4, 5 hours of sleep and go back to school. (x)
It was only in 2012 that schools went from having classes on Saturday excluding the first and third Saturday, and it was only in 2007 when they changed from having class every Saturday. (x)
This system is literally the epitome of the factory schooling system which comes as a result of a capitalistic schooling system and it works kids too hard which is one of the reasons Korean school kids are some of the unhappiest of pretty much any OECD country. (x)
For the photo on the right, physical punishment is not fully banned in Korea. 
Since 2011, Seoul, Gyunggido, Gangwondo, and Julla Bukdo have banned the use of direct physical punishment, or basically hitting kids with either tools or physically with their body. That being said that’s basically only about half of South Korea. 
Also, indirect physical punishment such as making kids to planks, make them kneel with their hands up, making them run laps, or of the sort is still fully acceptable in all Korean schools. (x)
Anybody who’s a Korean in a Korean school right now already has experience with getting beat by a teacher and some kids still have to deal with physical punishment by teachers. 
high resolution »

nantajoong:

fraubraun:

koreanstudentsspeak:

Left:

I want a go home I’m tired

Right:

Don’t Hit ME

what’s happenin in korea

You want to know what’s happening? Korea’s education system is literally the most rotten piece of shit to ever exist. 

Let me explain the context of the poster on the left. 

The average time a kid spends in school in the US is 900 to 1000 hours per year, spread between 175-180 days (x)

In 2007 there were mass student protests in Netherlands because they increased the hours spent in school to 1040 hours per year, or 8 hours a day, 130 days a year. (x)

Korean high schools, on the other hand, enact a 3150 policy, 225 days of school with 14 hours a day, or from 8 am to 10 pm (x)

Also due to the private education sector of hagwons and the fierce competition of Korean high schools, basically after school kids go to hagwons, or personal academies, till 2, 3 in the morning, fit in maybe 4, 5 hours of sleep and go back to school. (x)

It was only in 2012 that schools went from having classes on Saturday excluding the first and third Saturday, and it was only in 2007 when they changed from having class every Saturday. (x)

This system is literally the epitome of the factory schooling system which comes as a result of a capitalistic schooling system and it works kids too hard which is one of the reasons Korean school kids are some of the unhappiest of pretty much any OECD country. (x)

For the photo on the right, physical punishment is not fully banned in Korea. 

Since 2011, Seoul, Gyunggido, Gangwondo, and Julla Bukdo have banned the use of direct physical punishment, or basically hitting kids with either tools or physically with their body. That being said that’s basically only about half of South Korea. 

Also, indirect physical punishment such as making kids to planks, make them kneel with their hands up, making them run laps, or of the sort is still fully acceptable in all Korean schools. (x)

Anybody who’s a Korean in a Korean school right now already has experience with getting beat by a teacher and some kids still have to deal with physical punishment by teachers. 

mahimahi713:

cannibals-insomnia:

I’m putting my cat on a vegan diet.

"how could you do that! that’s animal abuse"

No it’s not. a vegan-only diet is actually very healthy for them.

"cats are carnivores. they need to eat meat"

I know. that’s why it’s a vegan-only diet. I feed them only the finest vegans I can find.

I was about to go off on you

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

a few of Grimes’s super groovy stage set-ups

(Source: mysong5)

dancefuckerdancev:

jiggalopuff:

what the fuck

what does his mother think of him not having a shirt on?